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A Word About Cover Letters…

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Even though not delivered through the mail, we still call them cover letters. They are now most often the email message that accompanies resume submissions if requested. The cover letter should not be a repeat of what is in the resume. If not used, they become excellent talking points for your interview.

While the resume must specifically respond to job posting requirements, the cover letter is your opportunity to present the value you would bring to the target position.  State why you would be the perfect candidate to join the company/organization and how you can contribute. Focus on how you can competently fulfill the qualifications or duties stated in the job posting. It is also a good idea to share a bit about your motivations and passion for the industry. Having said all of that, keep it brief, this is a short letter less than a full-page, if possible.

If you have the opportunity to attach a real letter, insert a header with your name and contact information at the top. Since most “cover letters” are submitted online, simply add the content into an email message. If you have the hiring manager’s contact name/email address, use it, but often a name is not known. However, I recommend that you do not use salutations like Dear Hiring Manager or Dear Sir or Madam or To Whom It May Concern. In closing, express your interest in the company (use the company name) and interest in an interview. Be sure to add your contact phone number.

You want your cover letter to support you as a “stand-out” candidate worthy of an interview. Should you need help with your resume and cover letter, I’d be happy to chat with you. Contact me here.

All my best,

Brenda

 

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